Albanian asylum claims toolkit

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Albanian asylum claims toolkit2019-06-12T11:12:46+00:00

MiCLU and Shpresa Programme‘s Breaking the Chains project, which focuses on strategies to improve the prospects of Albanian children making successful protection claims, has brought together specialist barristers, solicitors and academics to consider how legal professionals and others can ensure that children from Albania are granted meaningful protection against the risks of return to abuse in their country of origin or further exploitation in the UK.

As part of this initiative MiCLU have worked with other partner organisations to create and gather resources that can be used by lawyers representing young Albanian asylum seekers. We will be gradually adding to the resources below. Your feedback on using the resources is valuable to us: contact miclu@islingtonlaw.org.uk.

Photography by young people at Shpresa Programme expressing their experiences engaging with the asylum process is featured below.

A practical response to the certification of Albanian cases – David Neale and Gurpinder Khanba (June 2019)2019-06-12T10:58:17+00:00

This briefing note is prepared jointly by Garden Court Chambers and MiCLU to raise awareness in the sector of a sudden spike in the numbers of asylum claims by Albanian nationals which have been certified as ‘clearly unfounded’ under s.94 of the Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002, and to encourage a practical response that protects clients who are at risk of refoulement to Albania.

The briefing note is a resource that we hope will save legal practitioners time in their daily practice, and is intended to be used by new-starters without too much supervision.

Albanian blood feuds and certification: A critical view – David Neale (April 2019)2019-06-12T10:56:26+00:00

Albanian blood feuds and certification: a critical view is prepared by David Neale of Garden Court Chambers, and is an expanded and updated version of a paper first published at the Breaking the Chains event, hosted by MiCLU and Shpresa Programme in June 2018.

Albanian blood feuds and certification: a critical view criticises aspects of the Home Office country information and guidance on blood feuds in Albania and offers strategies to legal practitioners for countering arguments based on current country guidance employed by the Home Office to certify Albanian asylum claims.

Albanian boys and young men: The risk of trafficking and re-trafficking on return – David Neale (June 2019)2019-06-12T10:46:04+00:00

This paper, prepared by David Neale of Garden Court Chambers, analyses Asylos’ new report and argues that many Albanian asylum-seeking boys and young men are at risk of trafficking or re-trafficking on return to Albania.

This paper will be useful to lawyers who are representing Albanian boys and young men, both those who are already victims of trafficking and those who have claimed asylum on another basis but may be at risk of trafficking on return.

Albania: trafficked boys and young men – Asylos (May 2019)2019-06-12T10:44:35+00:00

This report, published by Asylos in collaboration with the Asylum Research Centre (ARC) Foundation, covers nine key research areas relating to the trafficking of Albanian boys and young men and includes interviews with ten different individuals and organisations.

This important piece of research aims to fill the gap in the COI literature about the situation of Albanian boys and young men who are victims of trafficking.

The findings of the Asylos report are discussed further in David Neale’s paper Albanian boys and young men: the risk of trafficking and re-trafficking on return.

Albania: Reviewing the country of origin literature and addressing the gaps in research – Dr Rachel Alsop (June 2018)2019-06-12T10:54:58+00:00

This paper, presented by Dr Rachel Alsop at the Breaking the Chains event hosted by MiCLU and Shpresa Programme in June 2018, reviews the available country of origin literature on Albania and finds that the country guidance for Albania used in decision making on asylum claims for unaccompanied young people is not fit for purpose.

Dr Alsop’s paper finds significant gaps in the literature and concludes that without sufficient research data to draw on, the country guidance is problematic as it is not adequately informed by the lived experiences of the young people.

Practical issues for lawyers – Powerpoint presentation by Gurpinder Khanba2019-07-10T11:11:51+00:00

This is a presentation by Gurpinder Khanba for lawyers representing Albanian cases, providing advice on how to front-load case and face off potential certification by the Home Office.